Emily of new moon book report

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Emily of new moon book report

The House in the Hollow The house in the hollow was "a mile from anywhere"--so Maywood people said. It was situated in a grassy little dale, looking as if it had never been built like other houses but had grown up there like a big, brown mushroom. It was reached by a long, green lane and almost hidden from view by an encircling growth of young birches.

No other house could be seen from it although the village was just over the hill. She had plenty of company. There was Father--and Mike--and Saucy Sal.

The Wind Woman was always around; and there were the trees--Adam-and-Eve, and the Rooster Pine, and all the friendly lady-birches. And there was "the flash," too.

She never knew when it might come, and the possibility of it kept her a-thrill and expectant. Emily had slipped away in the chilly twilight for a walk. She remembered that walk very vividly all her life--perhaps because of a certain eerie beauty that was in it--perhaps because "the flash" came for the first time in weeks--more likely because of what happened after she came back from it.

Emily of new moon book report

It had been a dull, cold day in early May, threatening to rain but never raining. Father had lain on the sitting-room lounge all day. He had coughed a good deal and he had not talked much to Emily, which was a very unusual thing for him.

Amazingly, Emily finds New Moon beautiful and fascinating. With new friends and adventures, Emily might someday think of herself as Emily of New srmvision.coms: Jan 04,  · It is decided that Emily would live at New Moon with rigid Aunt Elizabeth, timid Aunt Laura and odd Cousin Jimmy. Helped by her overactive imagination and some new friends, Emily slowly adjusts to life at her new home/10(). Emily O'Neill is an artist, writer, and proud Jersey girl. Pick her brain here.

The Tree of Knowledge looked exactly like the squat little apple-tree, and Adam and Eve stood up on either side as stiffly and rigidly as did the spruces. Emily wondered what Father was thinking of, but she never bothered him with questions when his cough was bad.

She only wished she had somebody to talk to. She did nothing but grunt, and grunts meant that Ellen was disturbed about something.

She had grunted last night after the doctor had whispered to her in the kitchen, and she had grunted when she gave Emily a bedtime snack of bread and molasses. It was not often that Ellen allowed her anything to eat before going to bed, and when she did it meant that for some reason or other she wanted to confer a special favour.

Emily expected the grunting attack would wear off over night, as it generally did; but it had not, so no company was to be found in Ellen.

Not that there was a great deal to be found at any time. Douglas Starr had once, in a fit of exasperation, told Emily that "Ellen Greene was a fat, lazy old thing of no importance," and Emily, whenever she looked at Ellen after that, thought the description fitted her to a hair.

For one thing, there was always such a crowd with Christiana.

Emily of new moon book report

She had not half the fascination of that solitary, intrepid figure who faced all alone the shadows of the Dark Valley and the encounter with Apollyon. Darkness and hobgoblins were nothing when you had plenty of company. But to be alone--ah, Emily shivered with the delicious horror of it!

May be you will be interested in other books by Lucy Maud Montgomery: Emily of New Moon.
Author Chat with Julieanne Lynch (Beneath The Lighthouse), Plus Giveaway! The House in the Hollow The house in the hollow was "a mile from anywhere"--so Maywood people said. It was situated in a grassy little dale, looking as if it had never been built like other houses but had grown up there like a big, brown mushroom.
Get your copy here! Got it Covered June 14, My second book officially has a cover!

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When Ellen announced that supper was ready Douglas Starr told Emily to go out to it. The bread was soggy and her egg was underdone, but for a wonder she was allowed to have both Saucy Sal and Mike sitting, one on each side of her, and Ellen only grunted when Emily fed them wee bits of bread and butter.

Emily loved them both, but Mike was her favourite. He was a handsome, dark-grey cat with huge owl-like eyes, and he was so soft and fat and fluffy.

Sal was always thin; no amount of feeding put any flesh on her bones. Emily liked her, but never cared to cuddle or stroke her because of her thinness.

Yet there was a sort of weird beauty about her that appealed to Emily. She was grey-and-white--very white and very sleek, with a long, pointed face, very long ears and very green eyes.

She was a redoubtable fighter, and strange cats were vanquished in one round. The fearless little spitfire would even attack dogs and rout them utterly.Emily of New Moon is the first in a series of novels by Lucy Maud Montgomery.

Similar to her earlier and more famous Anne of Green Gables series, the Emily novels depicted life through the eyes of a young orphan girl, Emily Starr, who is raised by her relatives after her father dies of consumption.

emily of new moon by montgomery, l. m. (lucy maud), to mr george boyd macmillan alloa, scotland in recognition of a long and stimulating friendship. Emily O'Neill is an artist, writer, and proud Jersey girl.

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Pick her brain here. Emily is also said to be semi-autobiographical in nature, so I was very curious to explore her series. I lept into the first book, "Emily of New Moon," as soon as the box arrived, and found even this initial book about Emily's childhood to be very different from srmvision.coms: At first, Emily's miserable under all the rules from her stern Aunt Elizabeth.

And being the new girl at school is not easy. At least New Moon provides plenty of material for the short stories she loves to write. With her quick wit and lively imagination, it's not long before . Jan 04,  · It is decided that Emily would live at New Moon with rigid Aunt Elizabeth, timid Aunt Laura and odd Cousin Jimmy.

Helped by her overactive imagination and some new friends, Emily slowly adjusts to life at her new home/10().

Emily of New Moon (Emily of New Moon #1) by L. M. Montgomery Book Reviews